Apply today! 2015 Urban Journalism Workshop

UPDATE: the application deadline has been extended to January 28. Apply today!

Applications are now open for the 2015 Urban Journalism Workshop.

The Washington Association of Black Journalists has partnered with the Washington Post Young Journalists Development Program (YJDP) to give high school students in the Greater D.C. area an inside look at careers in journalism through the Urban Journalism Workshop (UJW). During the workshop, experienced journalists from The Washington Post, the Associated Press, National Public Radio and other media companies train students in the basics of traditional and multimedia journalism. Three scholarships will be awarded to seniors who have excelled during the workshop and demonstrate strong research, reporting and writing ability. There is no fee to apply or attend.All high school students in DC and suburban MD and VA are encouraged to apply.

This year’s workshop runs March 12 to May 9, 2015. Complete applications are must be postmarked by January 20, 2015 for consideration.

For more information, contact UJW coordinator Susan Carter at wabj.ujw@gmail.com

The UJW application can be found here: UJWapp2015.

Urban Journalism Workshop 2015 Coming soon!

The 2015 Urban Journalism Workshop will start Saturday, March 12, 2015. Check back here shortly for applications, which will be due in January.

The Washington Association of Black Journalists has partnered with the Washington Post Young Journalists Development Program (YJDP) to give high school students in the Greater D.C. area an inside look at careers in journalism through the Urban Journalism Workshop (UJW). During the workshop, experienced journalists from The Washington Post, the Associated Press, National Public Radio and other media companies train students in the basics of traditional and multimedia journalism. Three scholarships will be awarded to seniors who have excelled during the workshop and demonstrate strong research, reporting and writing ability. There is no fee to apply or attend.

All high school students in DC and suburban MD and VA are encouraged to apply.

Cherry Blossom Official Merchandise Scores Home Run at the 2014 Cherry Blossom Parade

By Tayah Harper
UJW Staff Writer

WASHINGTON — Adam Mayhew serves a customer as many others wait patiently in the long line. Most of the customers are waiting to buy just a shirt, while others were buying a bag, mug, hat, or other item. All these items will represent someone’s trip, whether long or short, to the April 12 Cherry Blossom Festival. It is Mayhew’s job to make sure these items get sold before the day is over.

Mayhew started his hectic day at 4 a.m. He arrived at 14th Street and Constitution Avenue by 5 a.m. to set up the merchandise stand.

“The boss has a great relationship with the Cherry Blossom Festival,” Mayhew said. “That’s why he has the only company to sell official merchandise.”

The company, whose CEO was not named, has been a successful vendor for five years now. It first started off as a small business with t-shirt printing. Eventually, they expanded and landed a deal with the Cherry Blossom Festival.

“At first, he was working in two offices and a warehouse in Virginia. Now he has offices in California and a warehouse Atlanta,” Mayhew said. “For the festival, he gets people he trusts to work for him. He knows they’ll get the job done.”

The top selling items at the vendor are the 100th Year Anniversary Shopping Tote, Head Boppers, and the “I Blossom DC” t-shirt.

“I bought the head boppers for my daughter,” Isabelle Felder said. “This is her first time coming to the parade and I want her to have something to remember.”

“My husband is in the Army and we travel a lot. I wanted to make sure my daughter had a chance to visit while we were here. In addition to that, I wanted to get her a souvenir for when we move again,” Felder said.

Damien Lucas, who is from Henrico, VA, loves the festival and one particular shirt.

“I got a great shirt for my fiancé,” Lucas said. “It reads “I Blossom D.C.” and I’m sure she’ll love it as much as I do.”

It was a great day for sales, as the parade occurred during peak bloom, which attracted more attendants.

“I was happy to see the cherry blossoms, which are the obvious stars of the festival,” Lucas said. “When they’re in bloom and the weather is nice, they’re beautiful. It was just an overall great day.”

Amid Parade, Japanese Culture Abounds

By Gabrielle Headly
UJW Staff Writer

WASHINGTON — The National Cherry Blossom Festival was filled with people from all walks of life who came together to partake in the Japanese tradition of hanami.
Hanami is a Japanese custom of enjoying the beauty of spring flowers, usually cherry blossoms.

Many displayed their adoration for Japanese culture in a multitude of ways, from their presence to bearing small accessories like fans.

But a small amount of people proudly displayed their love for the culture in their attire, by wearing traditional Japanese garments.

A majority of these people weren’t in fact Japanese, but either white or African American.

Many, like Anime lover Everett Turner, have been admiring the culture for years.

“I just love the Japanese culture, I’ve been studying the language and everything. This [garment] was a gift, I just decided to wear it, in honor of it [the festival] and to be a little different.” Turner said.

Other blossom enthusiasts have even majored in Japanese studies in college and have spent years studying abroad.
But even after spending years immersed in Japanese culture, there’s something about the blossoms that brings them back.

“The most Japanese part of the day is going to the Tidal Basin and seeing cherry blossoms,” said Michelle Riley, a former Japanese resident. “But unfortunately, we don’t get to drink Sake outside and have a picnic there like in Japan.”

The Cherry Blossom Parade was easily a common ground for all culturists, linguists, and otaku.

Tourists Find Joy in Cherry Blossom Parade

By Chloe Thompson
UJW Staff Writer

Washington–Anja, a traveler from Denmark said the only reason she heard of the parade was from Cherry Blossom attendees at the Tidal Basin.

“We saw the cherry blossoms when we came here two days ago. We didn’t know they were blooming, it was a big surprise to us,” she said. When asked about her favorite part of the festivities, she replies, “The cherry blossoms.”
This seemed to be a running theme among the patrons of the 2014 National Cherry Blossom Festival. Crowds were gathered on the sidewalk, on the streets, and on an occasional museum lawn.

With many people comes many different stories and reasons, and this point was exemplified by the contrasting rationale of interviewees. One such group was the organization Donate Life. This group attended the parade to promote their organization, because April is National Donate Life Month.

Another group was a dance troupe from the Philadelphia High School for the Creative and Performing Arts, which came down to D.C. to perform in the parade. And then there were the group of women from Chicago getting food from a hot dog stand who simply said, “We came down for the food.”

The parade seemed to have entertained the masses, but many people agreed: The reason they were there, by far, was for the cherry blossoms.